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American School for the Deaf
In 1817, Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, a recent Yale graduate and ordained clergyman, met the Dr. Mason Fitch Cogswell family and their deaf daughter, Alice. Embarking on a voyage to Europe to learn the art of educating deaf children, Gallaudet encountered the exciting work of l'Institut National de Jeunes Sourds de Paris (school for the deaf in Paris, France). He then enlisted Laurent Clerc, a talented, young, deaf teacher to join him in a historic journey back home to establish the first permanent school for the deaf in the United States. Over the years, this school has served as the "Mother School" in providing an exemplary model educational program; a site for teacher training and practicum; and as a springboard from which trained and experienced educators of the deaf went forth to educate and to start other schools for the deaf all over the country and to help found a college in Washington, D.C. We are proud of our alumni who are engaged in the world as educated, self-supporting and productive citizens.We take pride in our tradition of excellence and innovative educational programming. As we address the ever-present challenge of serving infants, children, youth and adults who are deaf and hard of hearing, we are always seeking ways to apply new knowledge, approaches and technology in our work., American School for the Deaf